Is delta 8 addictive

Is Delta 8 Addictive?

First, marijuana began to be legalized in several states. Then you started to see ads for CBD. Lately, something called delta 8 has been receiving increased publicity. But you don’t know much about this substance, other than that it is somehow related to marijuana, but it’s not really marijuana. Understandably you have questions. What, exactly, is delta 8? Is it legal? Are there dangers? Is delta 8 addictive?

What is Delta 8?

Before we explore the question, “Is delta 8 addictive?” let’s spend a bit of time to understand what this substance actually is. 

Delta 8 is a shortened version of delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol. It is also sometimes called delta-8 THC. Regardless which term you use, delta 8 is a psychoactive compound that is naturally produced by the cannabis sativa plant. This is the same plant that used to produce marijuana, hemp, hashish, and several other substances. 

Here are a few quick facts about delta 8 and other elements of the cannabis sativa plant: 

  • In marijuana, the primary psychoactive element is delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, which is typically referred to simply as THC. 
  • Delta 8 and THC are categorized as cannabinoids. There are more than 100 cannabinoids that occur naturally within the cannabis sativa plant. 
  • In addition to delta 8 and THC, the other most widely recognized cannabinoid is probably cannabidiol, or CBD. 
  • Unlike delta 8 and THC, CBD does not have psychoactive properties, which means that people who ingest CBD will not experience the high that is usually associated with cannabis use.

Is There THC in Delta 8?

Yes, there is some THC in delta 8.

While some states have legalized or decriminalized marijuana (with delta 9 THC), its sale, possession, and use is still illegal in other states, and in the eyes of the federal government. However, hemp (which is also produced from the cannabis sativa plant) was declared legal by the U.S. federal government in 2018. 

By law, hemp contains less than 0.3% THC. It is used in the manufacture of many products, including rope, paper, clothing, and insulation. 

Delta 8 is typically synthesized from CBD that has been extracted from hemp. Thus, delta 8 is a derivative of a legal product. However, unlike hemp, delta 8 can be added to edibles or ingested via vaping. And while the amount of THC in delta 8 is far less than in delta 9, it is enough to produce certain psychoactive effects.

Capitalizing on the fact that delta 8 is derived from legal hemp, several retailers began to sell delta 8 in states where marijuana (THC) was illegal.

In May 2022, a federal appeals court ruled that delta 8 is legal because it fits into the definition of hemp as established in the 2018 Farm Bill (which legalized hemp throughout the United States). The court’s decision was based in part on the fact that delta 8 is derived from hemp and delta 8’s THC content does not exceed 0.3%.

Is Delta 8 Addictive?

Marijuana is typically viewed as having a low risk of addiction. Since delta 8 has much less THC than marijuana does, it is common to wonder, is delta 8 addictive?

The answer, as ads often say, may surprise you.

Yes, delta 8 is addictive. Delta 8 addiction is not common, but that doesn’t mean it is impossible to become dependent on this marijuana derivative. People can, and do, become addicted to delta 8. Some will also need proper treatment to overcome this addiction.

Does Delta 8 Have Withdrawal Symptoms?

Withdrawal refers to the distressing physical and/or psychological symptoms that a person experiences when the suddenly stop using the drug they have become addicted to.

If you develop delta 8 addiction, and then you either can’t acquire the substance or you try to quit using it, you may develop withdrawal symptoms such as:

  • Anxiety and irritability
  • Depressed mood
  • Abdominal pain
  • Disrupted sleep patterns
  • Headaches
  • Fever or chills
  • Heavy sweating

Dangers of Delta 8 Addiction

Addiction is, in part, by a loss of control. When you become addicted to delta 8, you will not be able to control how often you use the drug, or how much you use.

The compulsion to use delta 8 can expose you to considerable dangers, including:

  • Physical harm due to impaired behaviors and/or poor judgment
  • Strained or ruined relationships with friends and family
  • Using delta 8 in increasingly dangerous ways, such as in combination with other substances
  • Being arrested or injured in a car accident because you were driving while under the influence of delta 8
  • Health problems due to using illicitly manufactured delta 8 that has been cut with other substance
  • Diminished performance in school or at work
  • Job loss and unemployment
  • Development of a co-occurring mental health disorder

What to Do if You Become Addicted to Delta 8?

If you have become addicted to delta 8, consult with your doctor or another healthcare provider. Delta 8 addiction is a treatable condition. The professional that you consult with can assess your needs and recommend appropriate treatment options.

During treatment, you can address the issues that led to your delta 8 addiction. You can also learn how to manage stress and handle other difficult situations without falling into delta 8 abuse. 

If your delta 8 addiction is accompanied by anxiety, depression, or another mental health concern, you can also get help for these issues while you’re in treatment. When you get the care you need, you can learn to manage your behavioral compulsions and co-occurring concerns, so that you can live a healthier life.

Begin Treatment for Delta 8 Addiction in Los Angeles, California

Sanctuary Treatment Center provides effective care for adults who have become addicted to delta 8, marijuana, and other substances. Our treatment center in Los Angeles, California, offers personalized services at several levels, including detoxification, inpatient rehab, and outpatient programming. If you have been struggling with delta 8 addiction, the Sanctuary Treatment Center team can help. Contact us today to learn more.

Man wondering if addiction is a disability

Is Drug Addiction Considered a Disability?

Dependence on alcohol or another drug can undermine a person’s ability to work, attend school, maintain healthy relationships, and otherwise enjoy a full and productive lifestyle. There’s no question that this condition can be devastating. But is addiction a disability?

Is Drug Addiction a Disability? 

Disability is a relatively common term, but its definition can change considerably depending on the context in which it is being discussed.

For the purposes of this post, we are going to consider the question “Is addiction a disability?” from a legal perspective. In the United States, one legal definition of disability can be found in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was signed into law in 1990.

The ADA protects people from being discriminated against on the basis of disability. According to the ADA website, a person is considered to have a disability if they meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • They have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.
  • They have a history or record of such an impairment (such as cancer that is in remission).
  • They are perceived by others as having such an impairment (such as a person who has scars from a severe burn).

Substance use disorders (which is the clinical term for addiction) are mental impairments that can substantially limit a person’s ability to function in one or more important areas of life. This means that, as established by the ADA, the answer to the question, “Is addiction a disability?” is yes. 

It is important to understand that the ADA only applies to certain situations. Here’s how the scope and limitations of the law are summarized on the ADA website:

The ADA guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to enjoy employment opportunities, purchase goods and services, and participate in state and local government programs.

Of course, there are many aspects of modern life that fall outside the parameters of employment, consumer activities, and participation in government programs. Some of these other aspects are addressed in the ADA, while others are left to state and local governments. So, is addiction a disability in California (or any other state)? Under the ADA, the answer is still yes. But the level of protection a person can expect can vary from state to state.

Drug Addiction Employee Rights

Under the ADA, people who have substance use disorders have certain rights as employees and as candidates for jobs. But neither the ADA nor any other U.S. law guarantees continued employment for people who are actively abusing alcohol or other drugs. 

Is it Against the Law to Fire a Drug Addict?

According to the ADA, you cannot be fired from your job because you have an addiction. However, you can be fired if you have been caught using alcohol or other drugs in the workplace, or if a drug screening reveals that you have been using a prohibited substance.

Here are a few examples to illustrate how the law treats the distinction between having a substance use disorder and engaging in substance abuse:

  • If an employer or interviewer discovers that you have been treated for addiction, they cannot legally fire you or eject you as an applicant.
  • However, if you use alcohol or other drugs in the workplace, if you show up to an interview under the influence of a mind-altering substance, or if you fail a drug test, you can legally be fired or dismissed as a job candidate.

Can You Get Paid Disability for Having an Addiction?

If you live in California, you may be able to receive short-term disability payments through the California State Disability Insurance (CASDI) program while you are receiving treatment for addiction.

According to the State of California Employment Development Department, eligible employees may qualify for the following benefits:

  • Up to 30 days of disability insurance (DI) benefits while residing in an approved residential alcohol treatment facility that was recommended by a licensed mental health professional.
  • Up to 45 days of DI benefits while residing in a residential rehab facility that was approved by a licensed health professional.
  • In certain circumstances, you may also qualify for 60 more days in alcohol treatment and 45 more days in drug rehab.

To qualify for this benefit, you must have a job that is based in California, and you must be paying into the CASDI program. 

The federal government does not offer a similar program. However, if you qualify under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), you may receive up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave (and the continuance of your group insurance benefits while you are not working) to receive addiction treatment. 

How is Substance Abuse Treated Differently than Other Disabilities?

From a legal perspective, one of the main differences between substance use disorders and other disabilities is the distinction between the disorder (addiction) and the behavior (substance abuse). 

As we described earlier on this page, the ADA does not protect you from negative repercussions (including job loss) due to active substance abuse. Employers have the right to mandate a drug-free workplace. They are also allowed to require employees to complete drug screenings.

Thus, if you test positive on a drug screen, or if you are otherwise determined to be under the influence of a mind-altering substance while at work, you cannot use the ADA to prevent your employer from firing you. This is true even if you decide to enter a treatment program after you have violated your company’s substance use policy.

Contact Our Addiction Treatment Center in California Today

If you or someone that you care about has been struggling with an addiction to alcohol or another drug, Sanctuary Treatment Center can help. Our center provides multiple levels of personalized care, including detoxification, inpatient treatment, and outpatient programming. At every level, our clients receive compassionate services from a team of dedicated professionals. Contact us today to learn more. 

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Sanctuary Treatment Center accepts most private PPO insurance plans, as well as some private HMO plans. Through private insurance plans, individuals and families can access high quality addiction treatment services. If you have questions regarding insurances, please give us a call.

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